Archive | September, 2009

50s Quiff

25 Sep

Get your minds outta the gutter, ladeez & gentlemen. I’m talking about

‘Hair Quiffs From The 50s Pile It On’

by Karen Shelton (09/06/04)

Revised Date:  09/06/07 – Original Publication Date: 09/06/2004

Introduction

Kaley Cuoco on July 22, 2004 Jimmy Kimmel

All rights reserved – ABC/BYRON COHEN

Blame the return of the hair "quiff" on Patrick Robinson who’s the sizzling new designer at Perry Ellis.  Robinson showcased a fun, yet fresh, fashion collection at The Olympus Fashion Week in New York.

Not only did Robinson’s spectacular designs showcase the 50s-inspired clothing styles that are currently flooding the fashion scene, he had many of his models coiffed in the hot new quiff-like hairdos.

Famous for being upbeat, optimistic and edgy, Robinson matched his fun fashion designs with the retro hairstyles that are a combination of a heavily backcombed pouffy crowns with a mid-head straight tail.

There is some controversy over whether the quiff (pronounced so it sounds like wiff with a Q in front) is a 40s, 50s or 60s hairstyle. 

Some fashionistas claim the quiff first appeared in the mid 1940s around the time that World War II ended.  Others link it back to the era of the 50s or the 60s. 

In reality, the quiff doesn’t fade very far from the catwalks.  The edgy style emerges every few years in a variety of incarnations from a partial to a full blown hair design.

Imagine my excitement when I spotted gorgeous blonde Kaley Cuoco of ABC’s 8 Simple Rules (now defunct) on Jimmy Kimmel with a low key example of the hot new hairstyle.

Ironically, the Paris haute couture fashion show season which followed The Olympus Fashion Week in New York by several months demonstrated that Robinson is truly a trend setter.  Designer Yohi Yamamoto edged up his hot 50s fashion trends revolving around pastel cardigans and pretty skirts.  Yamamoto folded in some oversized suits on rail thin models with industrial-strength lacquered sky high quiffs. 

Following Robinson’s early lead, Yamamoto took the quiff hairstyle and supersized it.

Image from Clairol

All rights reserved

In some cases the front quiffs were combined with back hair knots and twists to trigger memories of a merged version of the the 50s bouffant/beehive.

Whether you wear it in a low key way with a ponytail like Kaley or a big style like the current Paris catwalks, the beauty of the quiff is that you don’t have to have long hair to wear the 2004 version.

Even short haired folks can wear the quiff.  They simply pop a pin-on pony at the back of their heads for the straight bottom flow.

The quiff, like all super finished styles, works best on day-old hair that has time to accumulate some natural hair oils.  When possible, create your quiff on hair that is not super soft or slippery.

There is some question about when the quiff first made its appearance.  Some say that it was in the mid 1940s around the time that World War II ended.  Others link it back to the era of the 50s. 

The 2004 version of the Quiff is sleeker and isolated to just the front portion of the head.  It is usually combined with the long sleek pony that either cascades to one side or straight down the back.

Step By Step Instructions

Follow the instructions below to steal Kaley’s catwalk quiff.

Image from Clairol

All rights reserved

Depending on whether you want a soft, low, ponytail version or a high "tail free" style, adjust the amount of teasing and backcombing you perform. 

1.  Start with aged hair (day old) that is either naturally straight or has been blown out stick straight. 

If you prefer to start with newly washed hair, be sure to prep with lots of styling products to help hold the quiff hairstyle in place.

2.  Using a comb, a pick, or the tail of either, create a vertical part that runs completely across the top of your head from ear to ear. 

The goal is to create two different sections of hair.  This should include a front and back section.  Depending on the desired height of the quiff, add more or less hair to the front section.

3.  Clip off the front section of hair from the back section.

4.  Separate the top section of hair into 1" sections.  Working on each section at a time, tease or backcomb the target section of hair to the desired height.

Note:  For the most lift and fullness it’s important to separate strands into smaller individual sections. 

5.  Smooth each teased section carefully with your fingers or a comb. Layer each section on top of the previous one to create a firm foundation. 

6.  Use a firm hold hairspray after you backcomb each section for strong hold.

7.  Pin the top section so that it has height and lift. 

For a more dramatic quiff as showcased on the Paris runways, pull all of your tresses off your forehead.  If you prefer a softer look, combine your quiff with a forehead fringe.

8.  Unclip the back section of hair.  Gather remaining strands into a ponytail.  Arrange the pony so the base rests at the middle of the back of your head.  Tie off the tail with a Blax or bungee that matches your current hair color. 

For a more finished look, select approximately 1 inch of hair from the side of the ponytail and wrap it around the base of the Blax or Bungee to camouflage the bangs.

For a more formal look, skip the ponytail and form the remaining hair in the back into a hair bun or twist.  Pin the newly formed bun up off the neck.

Summary

The hairstyle known as the quiff is considered by many hair experts to be a classic hairstyle.  Whether worn sky high at the crown or more like a sleek frontal hair bump, the quiff never really goes out of style*

*and you can take that any way you want, which reminds me of a joke I heard the other day by Chris Rock, which I have adapted, as follows:

A quiff is like Visa… it’s accepted everywhere

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50s Quiff

25 Sep

Get your minds outta the gutter, ladeez & gentlemen. I’m talking about

‘Hair Quiffs From The 50s Pile It On’

by Karen Shelton (09/06/04)

Revised Date:  09/06/07 – Original Publication Date: 09/06/2004

Introduction

Kaley Cuoco on July 22, 2004 Jimmy Kimmel

All rights reserved – ABC/BYRON COHEN

Blame the return of the hair "quiff" on Patrick Robinson who’s the sizzling new designer at Perry Ellis.  Robinson showcased a fun, yet fresh, fashion collection at The Olympus Fashion Week in New York.

Not only did Robinson’s spectacular designs showcase the 50s-inspired clothing styles that are currently flooding the fashion scene, he had many of his models coiffed in the hot new quiff-like hairdos.

Famous for being upbeat, optimistic and edgy, Robinson matched his fun fashion designs with the retro hairstyles that are a combination of a heavily backcombed pouffy crowns with a mid-head straight tail.

There is some controversy over whether the quiff (pronounced so it sounds like wiff with a Q in front) is a 40s, 50s or 60s hairstyle. 

Some fashionistas claim the quiff first appeared in the mid 1940s around the time that World War II ended.  Others link it back to the era of the 50s or the 60s. 

In reality, the quiff doesn’t fade very far from the catwalks.  The edgy style emerges every few years in a variety of incarnations from a partial to a full blown hair design.

Imagine my excitement when I spotted gorgeous blonde Kaley Cuoco of ABC’s 8 Simple Rules (now defunct) on Jimmy Kimmel with a low key example of the hot new hairstyle.

Ironically, the Paris haute couture fashion show season which followed The Olympus Fashion Week in New York by several months demonstrated that Robinson is truly a trend setter.  Designer Yohi Yamamoto edged up his hot 50s fashion trends revolving around pastel cardigans and pretty skirts.  Yamamoto folded in some oversized suits on rail thin models with industrial-strength lacquered sky high quiffs. 

Following Robinson’s early lead, Yamamoto took the quiff hairstyle and supersized it.

Image from Clairol

All rights reserved

In some cases the front quiffs were combined with back hair knots and twists to trigger memories of a merged version of the the 50s bouffant/beehive.

Whether you wear it in a low key way with a ponytail like Kaley or a big style like the current Paris catwalks, the beauty of the quiff is that you don’t have to have long hair to wear the 2004 version.

Even short haired folks can wear the quiff.  They simply pop a pin-on pony at the back of their heads for the straight bottom flow.

The quiff, like all super finished styles, works best on day-old hair that has time to accumulate some natural hair oils.  When possible, create your quiff on hair that is not super soft or slippery.

There is some question about when the quiff first made its appearance.  Some say that it was in the mid 1940s around the time that World War II ended.  Others link it back to the era of the 50s. 

The 2004 version of the Quiff is sleeker and isolated to just the front portion of the head.  It is usually combined with the long sleek pony that either cascades to one side or straight down the back.

Step By Step Instructions

Follow the instructions below to steal Kaley’s catwalk quiff.

Image from Clairol

All rights reserved

Depending on whether you want a soft, low, ponytail version or a high "tail free" style, adjust the amount of teasing and backcombing you perform. 

1.  Start with aged hair (day old) that is either naturally straight or has been blown out stick straight. 

If you prefer to start with newly washed hair, be sure to prep with lots of styling products to help hold the quiff hairstyle in place.

2.  Using a comb, a pick, or the tail of either, create a vertical part that runs completely across the top of your head from ear to ear. 

The goal is to create two different sections of hair.  This should include a front and back section.  Depending on the desired height of the quiff, add more or less hair to the front section.

3.  Clip off the front section of hair from the back section.

4.  Separate the top section of hair into 1" sections.  Working on each section at a time, tease or backcomb the target section of hair to the desired height.

Note:  For the most lift and fullness it’s important to separate strands into smaller individual sections. 

5.  Smooth each teased section carefully with your fingers or a comb. Layer each section on top of the previous one to create a firm foundation. 

6.  Use a firm hold hairspray after you backcomb each section for strong hold.

7.  Pin the top section so that it has height and lift. 

For a more dramatic quiff as showcased on the Paris runways, pull all of your tresses off your forehead.  If you prefer a softer look, combine your quiff with a forehead fringe.

8.  Unclip the back section of hair.  Gather remaining strands into a ponytail.  Arrange the pony so the base rests at the middle of the back of your head.  Tie off the tail with a Blax or bungee that matches your current hair color. 

For a more finished look, select approximately 1 inch of hair from the side of the ponytail and wrap it around the base of the Blax or Bungee to camouflage the bangs.

For a more formal look, skip the ponytail and form the remaining hair in the back into a hair bun or twist.  Pin the newly formed bun up off the neck.

Summary

The hairstyle known as the quiff is considered by many hair experts to be a classic hairstyle.  Whether worn sky high at the crown or more like a sleek frontal hair bump, the quiff never really goes out of style*

*and you can take that any way you want, which reminds me of a joke I heard the other day by Chris Rock, which I have adapted, as follows:

A quiff is like Visa… it’s accepted everywhere

50s Quiff

25 Sep

Get your minds outta the gutter, ladeez & gentlemen. I’m talking about

‘Hair Quiffs From The 50s Pile It On’

by Karen Shelton (09/06/04)

Revised Date:  09/06/07 – Original Publication Date: 09/06/2004

Introduction

Kaley Cuoco on July 22, 2004 Jimmy Kimmel

All rights reserved – ABC/BYRON COHEN

Blame the return of the hair "quiff" on Patrick Robinson who’s the sizzling new designer at Perry Ellis.  Robinson showcased a fun, yet fresh, fashion collection at The Olympus Fashion Week in New York.

Not only did Robinson’s spectacular designs showcase the 50s-inspired clothing styles that are currently flooding the fashion scene, he had many of his models coiffed in the hot new quiff-like hairdos.

Famous for being upbeat, optimistic and edgy, Robinson matched his fun fashion designs with the retro hairstyles that are a combination of a heavily backcombed pouffy crowns with a mid-head straight tail.

There is some controversy over whether the quiff (pronounced so it sounds like wiff with a Q in front) is a 40s, 50s or 60s hairstyle. 

Some fashionistas claim the quiff first appeared in the mid 1940s around the time that World War II ended.  Others link it back to the era of the 50s or the 60s. 

In reality, the quiff doesn’t fade very far from the catwalks.  The edgy style emerges every few years in a variety of incarnations from a partial to a full blown hair design.

Imagine my excitement when I spotted gorgeous blonde Kaley Cuoco of ABC’s 8 Simple Rules (now defunct) on Jimmy Kimmel with a low key example of the hot new hairstyle.

Ironically, the Paris haute couture fashion show season which followed The Olympus Fashion Week in New York by several months demonstrated that Robinson is truly a trend setter.  Designer Yohi Yamamoto edged up his hot 50s fashion trends revolving around pastel cardigans and pretty skirts.  Yamamoto folded in some oversized suits on rail thin models with industrial-strength lacquered sky high quiffs. 

Following Robinson’s early lead, Yamamoto took the quiff hairstyle and supersized it.

Image from Clairol

All rights reserved

In some cases the front quiffs were combined with back hair knots and twists to trigger memories of a merged version of the the 50s bouffant/beehive.

Whether you wear it in a low key way with a ponytail like Kaley or a big style like the current Paris catwalks, the beauty of the quiff is that you don’t have to have long hair to wear the 2004 version.

Even short haired folks can wear the quiff.  They simply pop a pin-on pony at the back of their heads for the straight bottom flow.

The quiff, like all super finished styles, works best on day-old hair that has time to accumulate some natural hair oils.  When possible, create your quiff on hair that is not super soft or slippery.

There is some question about when the quiff first made its appearance.  Some say that it was in the mid 1940s around the time that World War II ended.  Others link it back to the era of the 50s. 

The 2004 version of the Quiff is sleeker and isolated to just the front portion of the head.  It is usually combined with the long sleek pony that either cascades to one side or straight down the back.

Step By Step Instructions

Follow the instructions below to steal Kaley’s catwalk quiff.

Image from Clairol

All rights reserved

Depending on whether you want a soft, low, ponytail version or a high "tail free" style, adjust the amount of teasing and backcombing you perform. 

1.  Start with aged hair (day old) that is either naturally straight or has been blown out stick straight. 

If you prefer to start with newly washed hair, be sure to prep with lots of styling products to help hold the quiff hairstyle in place.

2.  Using a comb, a pick, or the tail of either, create a vertical part that runs completely across the top of your head from ear to ear. 

The goal is to create two different sections of hair.  This should include a front and back section.  Depending on the desired height of the quiff, add more or less hair to the front section.

3.  Clip off the front section of hair from the back section.

4.  Separate the top section of hair into 1" sections.  Working on each section at a time, tease or backcomb the target section of hair to the desired height.

Note:  For the most lift and fullness it’s important to separate strands into smaller individual sections. 

5.  Smooth each teased section carefully with your fingers or a comb. Layer each section on top of the previous one to create a firm foundation. 

6.  Use a firm hold hairspray after you backcomb each section for strong hold.

7.  Pin the top section so that it has height and lift. 

For a more dramatic quiff as showcased on the Paris runways, pull all of your tresses off your forehead.  If you prefer a softer look, combine your quiff with a forehead fringe.

8.  Unclip the back section of hair.  Gather remaining strands into a ponytail.  Arrange the pony so the base rests at the middle of the back of your head.  Tie off the tail with a Blax or bungee that matches your current hair color. 

For a more finished look, select approximately 1 inch of hair from the side of the ponytail and wrap it around the base of the Blax or Bungee to camouflage the bangs.

For a more formal look, skip the ponytail and form the remaining hair in the back into a hair bun or twist.  Pin the newly formed bun up off the neck.

Summary

The hairstyle known as the quiff is considered by many hair experts to be a classic hairstyle.  Whether worn sky high at the crown or more like a sleek frontal hair bump, the quiff never really goes out of style*

*and you can take that any way you want, which reminds me of a joke I heard the other day by Chris Rock, which I have adapted, as follows:

A quiff is like Visa… it’s accepted everywhere

LAST CALL, CYBER-BULLY!

25 Sep
 
 

LAST CALL, CYBER-BULLY!

25 Sep
 
 

LAST CALL, CYBER-BULLY!

25 Sep
 
 

AN UP & COMING TREND: Men Feigning They’re Female

25 Sep
 
Wow! I just talked to the real Mandy!
Boy, that imposter’s going to be in trouble tonight!
 
 
 
I could smell a dirty rat!
Remember, that’s why I’ve coined myself the gipsy queen! 
 
I just signed on here after being away since this morning & only taking 1 break, from cleaning since around 10 am, and right after I ended up wiping this nice story out by mistake, which I’m now typing over, I was thinking about the 75 yr old doors & baseboards I was scrubbing for hours on end. Just think, when I’m 80, they will be a century plus a decade in age, and I’ll probably still be cleaning them! I just don’t get some people. This girl just caught her boyfriend pretending that he was her. I told her that I was just humouring him because I already sniffed him out to be hiding something a while back & even called him a lame-brain, telling him that I get the feeling from his strange & erratic behaviour that he has a girlfriend & is trying to cheat on her. After I told him this, he did not reply, therefore I assumed I had hit the nail on the head (yet again). That was only yesterday, after he kept hitting on me sporadically for months now (a 23-24 yr old boy, at that, who apparently sired a newborn, as he was proudly boasting about it on his space). Just like Patty Hose & Heather (my-ass) Miller, who invited themselves to my network just recently; it’s the same thing with them… they’re posing as women when they’re really men. I have developed quite a knack for catching them red-handed by now!
 
What I don’t get is why these guys can’t try to pick up chicks the normal way, if you wanna call it that, by going out to a bar, or joining a dating club specifically for guys who want to cheat on their partners. I’m sure there is one like that, for I’ve seen it on the infomercials in the middle of the night. What’s the name of it? Ashley-sumfin, I fink (as Johnny Depp will say in From Hell). I have to pity these guys for just being dumb-assed dense, as well as have a lot of sympathy for their women, for I have been there & done that (meaning, I’ve had a lot of people deceive me & play me for a fool in my lifetime). It’s so obvious to me sometimes what some of these dummies are up to that they don’t even have to tell me; I can already read these clowns like an old joke-book. If you take a look at all the contacts some of them are making, they’re all vimen. Another dead give-away is that they don’t write anything about themselves – anywhere(s), heh. They’re just your typical examples of dough-headed boyz, iz awl! I’m tired of yung-uns hitting on me. The ones my age are already childish & tiresome as it is. Why would I want Grade F beef when there’s Triple A Angus, I always say! Hee hee hee!
 

Getting back to eating people’s hearts out & deceiving them, ever see that Goldie Hawn movie – I bet you can guess what it’s called, eh? Now, I’m going to warn you that the mistress of switch is going to change the topic, but sheez not straying too far from it. Take a look at the word "crush". Why the heck would they call it that for when you don’t feel like you’re crashing down &/or getting crushed, but rather you are lifted right up offa your ass and get a great boost of energy & enthusiasm for getting a move-on with things, I have found from experience. When you’ve got a shine for someone, this actually motivates you to achieve as much as you possibly can in one day – and with a smile on your face!

About 10 years ago, a Cuban friend (who defected here from guess-where with a bit of his immediate family & bought a condo in the same building as mine) used to come over with another neighbour of mine shortly after some of us got in from work for the day, to say hi and shoot the shit for a while. One night, he caught me right off guard when he gave my open-concept place the once-over & remarked how I needed a boyfriend. Well, he & I burst out laughing, because I could relate to what he was saying, then immediately began to shut the doors all around & tryed to hide the sloth I had become, if you know what I mean, jelly bean!

And so it goes ~ love will lift you right up off your butt & procrastination will destroy you like a cancer. This is what I have reconfirmed today, but I’m feeling great, otherwise. Like I said yesterday, ignorance is bliss, fo-shur! I just don’t know why people can’t see it this way. If you love something, why can’t you pay attention to it & take care of it, instead of ignoring it & letting it go to waste? Hmm. People should appreciate what they have, even the elderly in their lives. Take for example the old baseboards, doors & frames that I’ve been diligently scrubbing most of the day, including the rest that goes along with it. I’d rather see it as this: I’m paying attention to what really matters in this life & as for crushes, we will see if they get crushed in life’s jar of rocks or if they end up being lifted up to fly like a witch on a broom-handle. I’m having a devil of a time while I’m typing this out here. I’d better go & take care of my hands now, for without these, I would be nuttin’.

Before I bid you adieu, how many times do I have to say it, folks? Wake up & snap out of it (as Cher said to Nicholas Cage in Moonstruck). The kodras (Austrian slang for unneutered alley cats) are in heat this week; I heard them yowling, mewling & screeching out there in the past several days, & it sure ain’t sweet music to my ears. That’s why I’ve had my own cranked to high lately, just to drown them out, haha!

Hey, everyone, especially you dorky cheatin’ men out there…
there’s a time & a place for everything, and this isn’t a dating site for cowardly imposters looking to get laid. If you can’t figure that out by now, I’ll dig up my own home-made recipe for dividing your day into portions, turning yourself into an honest & decent individual, plus making the most out of what you already have (if I can locate it in eez werld), and written by the one & only, Li’l ë-ditz. Uh huh! Stuff that in your hat!

Gotta slather some cream on these worn-out dainty fingeez of mine now! I’ll catch up with yooz later, no doubt! I still have to incorporate some of this somewhat lengthy blog of mine into another essay about what’s been on my mind lately regarding taking care of the valuable things in your life & appreciating what you already have, but before I go, I need to mention that if you’re lookin’ to pick on someone or feel like picking a fight, you’ve come to the wrong place!

THIS IS MY SPACE, SO DON’T FORGET IT, PEOPLE!
And by that, I mean that I can boot you out any time I feel like it (haha). Have a better-than-good evening, y’awl!

Just don’t ask me to tuck you in &  you good-night   Don’t let the bed-bugs or any other bugs bite you this evening