A Woman Who Wore The Pants Quite Well

28 Feb

Never mind flying by the seat of your pants, folks! This lady I’m about to briefly tell you about takes on a whole new meaning where it concerns women wearing the pants, in my eyes.

I recently heard that Amelia Earhart’s remains were found on an island (I believe) almost 75 yrs after she mysteriously disappeared. Apparently a Canadian scientist is using DNA extracted from her personal belongings to determine that the place where they found them is definitely where Amelia had been left to rest  for almost a century now.  Earhart (pronounced AIR-hart) was born Jul 24, 1897 & went missing Jul 2, 1937. She was a noted American aviation pioneer & author. Earhart was the first lady to receive the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross, awarded for becoming the first aviatrix to fly solo across the Atlantic. She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organization for female pilots. Earhart joined the faculty of the world-famous Purdue University aviation department in 1935, as a visitor, to help counsel women on careers, as well as inspire others with her love for aviation. She was also a member of the National Woman’s Party, plus an early supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment.

Amelia Earhart - one of the most fiercely determined, daring & influential women in world history

Amelia Earhart - one of the most fiercely determined, daring & influential women in world history

 
 
NOTE: most of the info about Amelia that I have posted here (which I have somewhat reworded &/or edited) I have copied from the Wikipedia website… & thank-you for it, Jimmy Wales 🙂
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3 Responses to “A Woman Who Wore The Pants Quite Well”

  1. Bekkie In Wonderland March 19, 2011 at 12:47 am #

    I actually had a woman who lived upstairs from my X husband and I in Foster City, CA. (that would be La La Land for you) and not only was Amelia Earhart her great Aunt but she looked just like her. She had all kinds of pictures of her that I was lucky enough to see hung around her apartment that not many others probably got to see. She didn’t have any more to add to the story about her disappearence however. Her personality was probably a lot like Amelia’s also. Although she was married she was a very strong opionated woman that jogged every morning of her life while we were neighbors. I wish I has a picture of her though because she looks just like the picture with this blog and had very short hair too.
    I wonder what she knows (or if) about any remains being found as they moved away and I never saw the two of them again.
    She was very proud of her great Aunt and I don’t blame her!

  2. thelightningphoenix March 19, 2011 at 8:23 am #

    That is a very interesting story, Bekkie,
    and thank-you for sharing it with us.

    If it were not for storytellers swapping each other’s glimpses
    of things that other people might overlook or just take for granted
    like the simple pleasures others appreciate in life
    & describe these endearing moments, we would never ever know
    how beautiful life really is.

    You have portrayed this lady very nicely.
    Who knows? Perhaps we will hear more about your friend,
    by making attracting interest to our conversations & blogs here
    and we’ll be able to expand upon it even more.

    As for Amelia, I think she was a very attractive women.

    I seem to strike a bearing resemblance to her,
    not only in the facial features but also in
    my ability to be daring to no end without ever giving up 😛

  3. Styln April 5, 2011 at 5:37 pm #

    She was a great woman and is the definition of fearless!

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